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Frequently Asked QuestionsNgā Pātai e Kaha Whiua Ana

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  • Instalment 1: 22 August 2018.
  • Instalment 2: 21 November 2018.
  • Instalment 3: 20 February 2019.
  • Instalment 4: 22 May 2019.

Yes, but accurate details must be provided to ensure your payment is receipted to the correct account. View the different information that is required for paying different accounts

You should telephone the Napier City Council +64 6 833 8611 or

Transpacific Waste Management +64 6  879 8400

Rubbish is collected every week use our database to find out what day your rubbish is collected.

Recycling is collected every fortnight, use our database to find out what day your recycling is collected for the whole year.

The best way to view the District Plan is online as it is always up to date. You can also view a hard copy of the District Plan at Napier City Council or at the Napier and Taradale Public Libraries. If you have a fast connection to the internet we have provided the contents on the website.

As the registered owner you are responsible. However, it you provide us with a signed declaration containing the full contact details of the person driving the vehicle, we will forward the notice to them.

If you sell your car and get a parking ticket meant for the new owner, you can apply to have the liability transferred to them. You will need to provide a copy of the change of ownership form or the name and contact details of the new owner and supporting evidence, like a copy of an NZTA transfer receipt, notice of person selling/disposing of motor vehicle form or a sale agreement.

The Havelock North Drinking Water Inquiry made a number of recommendations to improve safety of New Zealand’s water supplies and changes to our Drinking Water Standards.

The Government has identified that illness from the country’s public water supplies is significant, with up to 100,000 people getting sick every year. The uncomfortable reality is that New Zealand's water networks have probably been housing dangerous pathogens (bugs) for years.

Two of the main outcomes for Napier from the Havelock North Inquiry have been:

  • The raising of bore heads above ground level to stop surface water entering the bore and potentially contaminating the water.
  • Chlorination of the pipe network following seven minor contamination issues in our reservoirs and pipe system.

The water we extract from the Heretaunga Plains Aquifer is of a very high quality, however, like the majority of other public water supplies, our network is at risk of becoming contaminated. One of the ways to reduce this contamination risk is to have disinfection in the network, and this is provided by chlorine.

Chlorine has been proven to be the most effective treatment for water supply networks for two main reasons:

  • It treats the water for pathogens (bugs).
  • It disinfects the pipes and reservoirs.

It is very likely that upcoming changes to the Drinking Water Standards will require a “disinfection residual” in New Zealand’s water supplies. It may soon be mandatory that our supply system is chlorinated.

Water

The Havelock North Drinking Water Inquiry made a number of recommendations to improve safety of New Zealand’s water supplies and changes to our Drinking Water Standards.

The Government has identified that illness from the country’s public water supplies is significant, with up to 100,000 people getting sick every year. The uncomfortable reality is that New Zealand's water networks have probably been housing dangerous pathogens (bugs) for years.

Two of the main outcomes for Napier from the Havelock North Inquiry have been:

  • The raising of bore heads above ground level to stop surface water entering the bore and potentially contaminating the water.
  • Chlorination of the pipe network following seven minor contamination issues in our reservoirs and pipe system.

The water we extract from the Heretaunga Plains Aquifer is of a very high quality, however, like the majority of other public water supplies, our network is at risk of becoming contaminated. One of the ways to reduce this contamination risk is to have disinfection in the network, and this is provided by chlorine.

Any of the examples below could result in contaminants being introduced into our water supply network:

  • At the source or aquifer or through private bores.
  • Backflow (reverse flow) from houses or industry.
  • Damage to the pipes (eg. during excavation work or through vandalism, or asset failure).
  • Illegal access to water from fire hydrants.
  • Illegal connections to the water network.
  • Through pests and birds entering storage reservoirs.

Chlorine has been proven to be the most effective treatment for water supply networks for two main reasons:

  • It treats the water for pathogens (bugs).
  • It disinfects the pipes and reservoirs.

It is very likely that upcoming changes to the Drinking Water Standards will require a “disinfection residual” in New Zealand’s water supplies. It may soon be mandatory that our supply system is chlorinated.

It is our understanding that Christchurch City Council are finalising a major project to address risks related to their bores. As they make their bores safe they are removing chlorine.

We have already made our bores safe and have moved on to making sure our network is safe as well. We have added Chlorine to help minimise the risks of contamination in our pipes and reservoirs after we had several positive tests for E. coli between January and November 2017.

Christchurch will also need to consider how they will maintain safety of their network and they will be working with their Drinking Water Assessor (DWA) to address this through their Water Safety Plans, just as we have with our Drinking Water Assessor (Hawke’s Bay District Health Board). Our DWA supports the decision to chlorinate Napier’s water as does the Ministry of Health.

Central Government is reviewing the regulations relating to Drinking Water. All indicators are that multi-barrier treatment processes and residual disinfection will be a mandatory requirement within the reticulation network.

The use of chlorine as both an effective treatment barrier and to provide residual disinfection is best practice worldwide and is cost-effective.

There are three main options that we could look at:

  1. Remove chlorine and accept the risk
  2. Continue to manage risk with chlorination
  3. Change our network to remove chlorine and minimise risks (Netherlands model)

Both the Hawke’s Bay District Health Board (our Drinking Water Assessor) and Napier City Council are not willing to risk lives by removing chlorine from the water. Chlorine is the most cost-effective, efficient way to minimise contamination risks in our network.

To bring the Netherlands model to Napier we would need to reduce network leakage from our current 22% (typical for a water network like ours) to less than 5%. We would need to replace large parts of our network (potentially 55% at $72m), and add extensive monitoring and control infrastructure (several more million dollars), changing the way the network operates.

The Netherlands model works due to high population density and took over a decade to change. The costs of operation are likely to be 5-10 times what we currently charge our ratepayers for water. Napier residents currently pay around $240 per household annually for unlimited water supply. Changing the network would likely increase the ongoing costs per household to over $1,200 per year. There would also be a large cost initially to rebuild the network and rough costs indicate that this could increase rates by around 20% annually for a ten-year period. This is likely to be uneconomic for our community.

There would still be chlorination in the network during contamination events and there would be boil water notices during these events.

  • Three bores have been brought above ground
  • Upgrades have been made to underground bore chambers to make them safe
  • Close down of two bores that didn't meet requirements
  • Improvements to water reservoirs
  • Introduction of chlorine treatment at the source
  • Increased planned maintenance of the supply system including extensive mains cleaning projects to remove biofilm (the accumulation of organic and inorganic matter attached to the insides of pipes and water storage tanks) from our water network.

The first dechlorinated water station, located on the south east corner of Anderson Park (York Ave side) will be built before the end of June 2019. The water station will have four taps and won't cost anything.

A second dechlorinated water station located close to the city centre is scheduled to be ready in 2020/21.

Open your outside tap until the water colour clears. If it doesn’t clear after 15 minutes, phone our Customer Service Centre on (06) 835 7579. 

If you are unhappy with the taste of the chlorinated water, you can leave the water in a jug for a few hours and the chlorine will dissipate. Bench top jug filters are also useful.

If you experience a very strong chlorine smell, similar to a swimming pool, this generally indicates that the chlorine is doing its job, not that there is a really high level of chlorine in the water. We need to know if you have a really strong chlorine smell so that we can check it out.

You can call us on our Customer Service Centre on (06) 835 7579 or go to www.napier.govt.nz/contact-us/fault-repair to report it.

We have put more money into water supply.

We are going to accelerate our pipe cleaning programme. This progamme will be implemented during the winter periods when the water demand is low. We are also planning to change the way our water supply is operating by introducing new water bores and making changes to the pipe network. These are major projects and will help to reduce the water clarity issues. These projects might take at least three years to complete. With these works, we will experience gradual improvements of our water clarity issue.

Major projects take resources and planning and take time to implement. We have brought a number of significant projects forward and our ability to deliver this accelerated programme will have its challenges.

More than $150 million, and it wouldn’t necessarily make it safer – there could still be breaches to the pipework from accidental and intentional breakages, and illegal connections. A complete replacement would need to be done in stages to minimise disruption. This would take more than a decade and would add significant increases to rates without the desired benefits and reduction in health risks.

In the first three years of the current Long Term Plan, we are spending about $250,000 per year. From year 2021/22, we will be increasing our spending on pipe replacements and over next 30 years we have planned to spend over $30m for pipe replacement. These costs exclude the larger capital spend that is planned for new water related projects.

Rates

  • Instalment 1: 22 August 2018.
  • Instalment 2: 21 November 2018.
  • Instalment 3: 20 February 2019.
  • Instalment 4: 22 May 2019.

Yes, direct debiting for rates is available weekly or fortnightly on a Tuesday or Thursday, monthly on the 20th of each month or by instalment on due date. Download an authority form

Yes, but you can only pay by credit card on our website, and there is a transaction fee charged by our provider. You can pay by cash, EFTPOS or cheque at the council offices. Pay my rates by credit card.

Yes, but accurate details must be provided to ensure your payment is receipted to the correct account. View the different information that is required for paying different accounts

ou can use our online database to find out the latest information that we have on your property or you can contact the Rates Department. View rates & property database

You should telephone the Rates Department on +64 6 834 4197 for answers.

Rubbish & Recycling

You should telephone the Napier City Council +64 6 833 8611 or

Transpacific Waste Management +64 6  879 8400

Rubbish is collected every week use our database to find out what day your rubbish is collected.

Household rubbish from domestic housekeeping.

Yes. Green waste, industrial waste, hazardous waste, trade waste and liquid waste of any nature are prohibited.

Recycling is collected every fortnight, use our database to find out what day your recycling is collected for the whole year.

You can put out a maximum of two rubbish bags per household. Up to 10kg and 60 litres each.

193 Springfield Road Taradale (head south down Gloucester St, past EIT, turn right before the bridge into Springfield Rd, approximately 2kms on the left) View more details about transfer station and a location map

Monday to Saturday - 7.30am - 5.00pm

Sunday - 9.00am - 5.00pm.

Holidays: Closed on Good Friday, Christmas and New Year's Day.

The Transfer Station's phone number is +64 6 844 4945.

Council does not supply Recycling Bins. You are able to use Supermarket Bags or cartons. If you prefer, the Recyclers will empty plastic crates which you need to purchase yourself.

You should telephone Napier City Council +64 6 833 8611 or

Green Sky Waste Solutions 0800 229 732.

Parking

A reminder notice will be sent to you if you have not paid your parking infringement notice with 28 days. If payment is still not made within 28 days after the reminder notice is sent, the unpaid parking infringement notice is lodged with the Ministry of Justice for collection (this will incur court costs). You will receive a Notice of Fine from the Ministry of Justice. You will have 28 days to pay the new fine to the Ministry of Justice which also includes court costs. For more information about the fine process, contact the Fine Enquiries line 0800 4 FINES (0800 434 637) or visit the Ministry of Justice website.

As the registered owner you are responsible. However, it you provide us with a signed declaration containing the full contact details of the person driving the vehicle, we will forward the notice to them.

If you sell your car and get a parking ticket meant for the new owner, you can apply to have the liability transferred to them. You will need to provide a copy of the change of ownership form or the name and contact details of the new owner and supporting evidence, like a copy of an NZTA transfer receipt, notice of person selling/disposing of motor vehicle form or a sale agreement.

You may have parked in an area with a time restriction e.g. you can only park for up to two hours (P120) in the parking spaces along Station Street.

This could be because you have not complied with two rules under the Land Transport (Road User) Rules 2004.

Rules like this are in place for our safety and no vehicle is permitted to stop, stand or park on yellow lines at any time. Refer to Land Transport (Road User) Rules 2004.

Parking infringement notices are issued when you exceed the time limit. Loading zones are for quick pick-ups and drop off of goods and passengers.

Paid parking is free on Sundays and statutory holidays. Other stationary vehicle offences still apply on Sundays.

You may have overstayed the maximum time limit in the space or you may have transposed your vehicle registration or used another vehicle on the day.

Roads & Streets

Phone Napier City Council on +64 6 8357579.

Roundabouts do work much better "most of the time" but in peak traffic flows they can fail to clear within a reasonable time frame, space can also be a limitation.

Traffic surveys show that excessive speed (in the top 85%) of vehicles is typical in most streets. If judder bars were installed in most Napier streets then vehicle movements would be restricted to the point of being unacceptable.

Pedestrian crossings are required to meet a warrant based on the number of pedestrians and vehicles amongst other things. Crossings that do not meet the warrant have proven to be less safe than no crossing at all.

Council is not the law enforcement agency. Council can only address the problem by installing local area traffic management schemes such as those in some roads in Taradale. Unfortunately these schemes are very expensive and can only be justified when the road is due for reconstruction.

District Plan

The best way to view the District Plan is online as it is always up to date. You can also view a hard copy of the District Plan at Napier City Council or at the Napier and Taradale Public Libraries. If you have a fast connection to the internet we have provided the contents on the website.

Yes you can still view the District Plan provisions pre Plan Change 10. Follow this link to the District Plan page.

The District Plan states which activities are allowed, and the conditions that must be met, for the activity to go ahead without a resource consents being required. Refer to the Activity and Condition tables in volume 1 of the District Plan to find out if your proposed activity is permitted.

A resource consent is a written approval to undertake an activity that is not permitted in the District Plan. The Council must grant consent for controlled activities, subject to conditions, but maintains discretion to approve or decline a restricted discretionary, discretionary activity or non-complying activity.

You will need to apply for a resource consent if your proposed activity is a controlled activity, restricted discretionary activity, discretionary activity or non-complying activity. No resource consent will be granted for any activity that is listed as a Prohibited Activity.

Yes, as long as your activity is not a prohibited activity, you are able to apply for a resource consent. The resource consent process allows an assessment of the effects on the environment to be completed. If the effects of your activity on the environment are no more than minor, and effected neighbours give their consent, a resource consent may be granted, provided conditions are complied with, thus allowing you to undertake your activity.

Sewerage

Wastewater is all of the used water that goes down a sink, bathroom or toilet drain. It always leaves your premises and is never delivered (unlike drinking water). Wastewater is also called sewage and wastewater pipes are known as drains, sewers or sewerage.

You may need to call your plumber/drain layer to investigate the cause. The Council will fix issues that are caused by the Council’s sewer pipes, which are generally outside private property. Any problems inside private property are to be managed by the owner.

A plumber/drain layer should be able to tell you what is causing the problem, and how it can be fixed. The Council sends out reminders to Napier Plumbers regarding the process they are to follow.

In most cases locating and exposing an inspection point at the boundary will take less than two hours. If a problem is found at the boundary you should contact the Council. Under no circumstances is the owner or drain layer allowed to excavate anywhere in the road reserve.

The Council will not fix or pay for any issues that are caused by faults inside of private property. Please note that the Council will not pay for camera inspections or jet cleaning.

Under no circumstances are members of the public, plumbers, or drain layers allowed to lift a manhole lid or enter a manhole. Manholes can be extremely dangerous and have caused numerous fatalities in the past. Under the Health & Safety in Employment Act 1992 Sewer Manholes, Storm Water Manholes and Wet Wells are deemed to be confined spaces and therefore must not be opened or entered.

Signs

The Napier City Council has adopted a number of restrictions on the placement of Election Signs on properties for the upcoming Local authority Elections. View full details about election hoardings.

To claim your rebate simply send a copy of your invoice for new signage to Napier City Council, Planning Department, Signage Rebate, Private Bag 6010, Napier 4142. Provided all conditions have been met you will then be sent a cheque for 20% of the invoice total (up to a maximum of $500 + GST).

You are still eligible to receive a 20% rebate provided that you do not introduce a moveable footpath sign in the future.

You must apply to the Napier City Council for approval of your signage prior to commencement of your upgrade. Prior to receiving your rebate cheque you must relinquish any moveable footpath sign with the agreement that you will not replace that sign with any other.

Napier City Council will rebate 20% of the total cost of new signage (up to a maximum of $500 + GST) to business owners who are motivated to upgrade or change their signage in accordance with the Guidelines. Incentives and conditions are further detailed in the Incentives flyer which is available on the Napier City Council website.

It is a regulatory document and covers certain elements of street use including placement of goods, tables and chairs. From March 2009 new moveable footpath signs are no longer permitted within the central business district. An annual fee will apply to existing businesses who do not take up the signage upgrade offer and wish to leave their existing moveable footpath signs on the street.

Signage changes to all listed Heritage buildings will require a Resource Consent.

When considering the design of your signage it is an ideal time to look at your building exterior as a whole. You could consider adapting air conditioning units, satellite dishes or anything else that obscures key building features and therefore detract from the overall appeal of the building. Napier City Council also offers repainting grants to building owners.

No. Each sign can be different to reflect the nature of the business, provided that each sign aligns with the principles of the Signage Guidelines. However, one primary integrated sign is preferable to many individual signs in a building that has multiple tenants.

Any graphic designer or sign writer can design and install your new signage. Sign writers across Hawke's Bay have been introduced to the Signage Guidelines and have been given further information to help them advise their clients. Please check that your sign writer has a copy and good understanding of the Signage Guidelines.

You don't need to know about all the architectural styles. Your sign writer should take the style of your building into consideration to ensure that your new signage is consistent with that style.

No - the objective is to provide guidance which can be used as a source of inspiration for redevelopment of signage to uphold the Art Deco characteristics of Napier City. Compliance is not mandatory but strongly encouraged by the Napier City Council. However in order to receive the rebate signs must reflect the principles within the guidelines.

You should apply to Napier City Council for approval before you commence work on design or development of new signage.

They relate to Napier's Heritage Precinct as shown on the map on page two of the Signage Guidelines and in the Incentives to upgrade signage flyer. In summary, this area includes businesses in Emerson Street, Tennyson Street, Hastings Street, Dickens Street and Dalton Street. The principles may also be applied to other heritage buildings elsewhere in the city.

Enhancing the visual appeal of Napier will ensure it remains a compelling place for shoppers, visitors and investors alike. This ultimately provides benefits to all local businesses and residents by stimulating the economic, tourism, cultural and social wellbeing of our city.

Napier's signage policy is in place to ensure signs are effective, attractive and sympathetic to Art Deco style. The policy protects the character and appearance of Napier's Art Deco Quarter. The Quarter is an important heritage area that has been described by international experts as the most complete and significant group of Art Deco Buildings in the world. In 1995 Napier's Art Deco Quarter (including much of the Napier central business district) was registered as an historic area under the Historic Places Act 1993. The Quarter has also been identified by the Department of Conservation as a site of World Heritage potential. As part of a periodic review of the heritage provisions of the city, the Napier City Council identified the city's signage as an area requiring review and improvement. Like other councils, Napier City Council has a duty to ensure signage is well designed to enhance the cityscape. But unlike most other councils, Napier City Council has the additional duty to ensure the unique Art Deco character is preserved and enhanced to make the city a site of national and international heritage importance.

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